3-Trails Corridor

Santa Fe Park

The one-quarter mile ruts, or swales, preserved in this 45-acre conservation area align with those preserved on the Bingham-Waggoner Estate. These tracks help modern-day travelers imagine the hundreds of thousands of people who, in the 1820s walked along side their Conestoga wagons loaded with cargo bound for Santa Fe in Mexico … who, in the 1840s had their life’s possessions packed in prairie schooners bound for Oregon … who, in the 1850s sought to strike gold in California … and who, in the 1860s simply set out west for a better life on the Pacific coast. Many of the Kansas City metro roads--especially those that transgress the congressional east-west/north-south alignments—were originally trail routes guiding those throngs of travelers through the early settlements throughout Jackson County, Missouri.
Thanks to: David W. Jackson

Santa Fe Park

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History

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Santa-Fe Trail oxen-made swales are still visible after more than 175 years are about 450 feet south of 31st Street and about 500 feet east of Santa Fe Road, on the west side of Santa Fe Terrace. Near 3126 Santa Fe Road, on the east side of the road, is a clearly visible wagon train path leading down a high creek bank. From here many of the original trails leading south and west have been obliterated by development. However, portions of one main route—the Independence-Westport Road— remain largely intact. This route will lead you, as they did in the 19th century, from Independence to Raytown…and, for those choosing an alternate path, to Westport.
Thanks to: David W. Jackson